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Archive for September, 2015

Sep29

Why You May Have Developed A Gap

developedgap

If you’ve had beautiful, straight, perfectly spaced teeth your whole life and suddenly develop a gap, you’re not alone. There is an array of reasons why a gap could suddenly be appearing in your teeth, and while it most likely does not need to be addressed, it can easily be fixed.

In some cases, the way that you swallow can be what’s affecting your teeth. Some people get into the habit of pushing their tongue outward when they swallow, which puts a lot of pressure on the teeth and can create a gap. Others suffer from a genetic combination that doesn’t allow teeth to stay together, and some suffer from a too closely attached labial frenum. The labial frenum is the tissue band that attaches the upper lip to the gums and if it attaches too closely to the front teeth than it can cause a gap over time.

Medically, treatment is not necessary, but in an aesthetic world, dentists understand the desire for a perfect smile. With braces, veneers, or composite bonding, your dentist can close your gap and bring your smile to life.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/09/12/ask-well-gap-toothed-2/

Sep23

Tips To Keep Your Enamel Strong

keepenamelstrong

Enamel is one of the strongest substances in your body. It serves as a protective barrier around teeth and is subject to decay when teeth are not well maintained. While many foods can harm enamel, here are a few things that you can do to keep enamel strong and free of decay.

1. Avoid sugary foods and drinks

Stick to water instead of juice, and try carrot sticks instead of gummy bears to keep your enamel healthy. Bacteria in your mouth feed on the sugar from your foods and drinks and then make acids. These acids wear away at enamel and cause tooth decay.

2. Eat foods that protect enamel

Adding calcium to your diet is a great way to counter decay as well as building strong bones and teeth. Try incorporating milk, cheese, and yogurt to help neutralize the acid in your mouth. Make sure to opt for the low-fat or fat-free option to keep your waistline and your teeth happy.

3. Avoid over-brushing

Brushing too aggressively is an easy way to harm your enamel. Instead use a soft-bristled brush and brush in short, gentle strokes to keep your teeth clean without harming enamel.

4. Use fluoride

Fluoride helps strengthen enamel and fight cavities. Add fluoride to your daily oral health routine in order to reap the benefits of fluoride. Fluoride has been shown to repair early stages of decay and make teeth more resistant to acids from foods.

Try these tips to keep enamel strong and healthy.

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-mouth-14/beautiful-smile/tooth-enamel-damage

Sep21

Is There a Link Between Cancer and Poor Oral Health?

canceroralhealth

If you suffer from swollen gums, missing teeth, or other poor oral health symptoms, then you may be at a higher risk of contracting human papillomavirus. Known as HPV, the human papillomavirus is a sexually transmitted disease that results in cancers of the cervix, mouth, and throat.

If you have poor oral hygiene, you are at a higher risk of contracting this disease orally. While there is only a modest association between oral health and the HPV infection, there is still a clear link. Researchers are unsure if “poor oral health causes HPV infection and then would go on to cancer.” What they did find was that even when excluding the number of oral sexual partners the subjects had, that those with poor oral health were 55 percent more likely to have an oral HPV infection.

The science behind this link is that poor oral health allows for sores, inflammation and lesions in your mouth, through which HPV can enter. It is much easier for HPV to enter through these inflamed areas in your mouth and enter the bloodstream. Researchers urge patients not to stress too much. They say that since the association is modest that people should not jump to varying their habits because these studies are in their infancy.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/21/study-ties-poor-oral-hygiene-to-cancer-causing-virus/

Sep14

Saliva: The True Mouth Guard

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Saliva is a big deal, especially when it comes to oral health. Saliva serves as a neutralizer in your mouth, it quiets enamel-eroding acids produced by bacteria in your mouth. It is your best line of defense against acids, sugars, and bacteria that aim to wear away your enamel.

What you might not have known about saliva is that there are two types of saliva. The first type of saliva is stimulated saliva, it appears in your mouth when you smell French fries or when you bite into a cheeseburger. It makes up 70-90 percent of the two to three pints of saliva that we each generate daily. It looks like water and helps to break down starches and balance the pH in your mouth.

The brother of stimulated saliva is unstimulated saliva. It is the saliva that is always in your mouth, keeping it from drying out and wrapping itself protectively around the surfaces of teeth. It is also necessary for our mouths and while it may be less glamorous that the saliva that arrives when our favorite dinner is headed our way, it is just as needed.

Saliva is vital to keeping teeth and gums happy and healthy. Lack of saliva could result in tooth decay and loss of taste. Talk to your dentist about a treatment plan if you experience dry mouth.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/26/health/the-mouths-guard.html

Sep9

Watch Out For Fluoride

watchfluoride

Fluoride is a must if you want healthy, strong, cavity-free teeth. Fluoride hardens enamel, which prevents decay. But, fluoride, which could often be found in, your town’s drinking supply may suddenly be harder to find.

Many towns nationwide have decided to stop fluoridating the water to save money. Some towns have opted out of adding fluoride because they produce enough naturally, but in many towns and cities this is not the case. Many Americans cannot afford dental care, and need the help of fluoride to keep their teeth healthy. If your town has announced that the water will no longer have added fluoride, then you need to know other sources where you can get fluoride.

Check for fluoride in your toothpaste, your mouthwash, and in bottled water to keep your teeth strong. Also, talk to your dentist about ways that you can add fluoride to your daily routine. Make sure to tell your dentist about the lack of fluoride in your water so that they can alter your treatment plan accordingly.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/14/us/more-places-change-course-on-fluoride-in-water.html

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