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Archive for February, 2016

Feb24

An Unexpected Way Social Anxiety May Impact Your Dental Health

When people think of social anxiety they normally think of the mental implications of the condition. In addition to the mental implications, however, there are also implications on dental health.

A study has found that tooth grinding, also known as bruxism, has been found in 42% of the study participants that had social anxiety, compared to the 28% in those that did not.

Bruxism is a serious condition that not only wears down the tooth but might also aggravate TMJ and jaw pain. If a socially anxious person is confronted with social situations all day without being treated for the anxiety they could suffer from serious damage to teeth.

Beyond the bruxism there is also the issue of the dry mouth that comes from anxiety. Good salivary flow in the mouth is important in preventing cavities by maintaining a good pH in the mouth and remineralizing the tooth enamel.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/05/150505121420.htm

Feb17

What You Should Know About Breastfeeding and Oral Health

During pregnancy many women experience changes in their teeth and gums. Increased teeth sensitivity as well as bleeding and swelling gums is common in pregnant women. While these symptoms are painful, teeth and gums go back to normal after the baby is born. After the child is born, breastfeeding has an oral health benefit for the child.

A study done by the National Center for Biotechnology Information found that children who breastfeed are more likely to have properly aligned teeth. Similar breastfeeding studies have shown that it is less likely for children who breastfeed to develop teeth misalignment later on in life.

These results were increased when children were breastfed for a longer period. Children who were breastfed for six months or longer reduced the risk of teeth misalignment by 72 percent.

Outside of proper teeth alignment, breastfeeding offers many other benefits to your baby. Nutritional support, resistance to infectious diseases, and an enhanced immune system are all benefits of breastfeeding. To learn more about the oral and overall health benefits of breastfeeding, talk to your healthcare provider.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23372130
http://news.health.com/2015/06/15/breast-feeding-may-have-dental-benefits-study-suggests/

Feb10

Dentistry Adaptation and Autism

Autism affects 1 in every 68 U.S. children. Often, children with autism struggle with anxiety in new situations, including during trips to the dentist.

Researchers from USC and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles decided to look into how dental environments could be adapted for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. They strived to make the environment more comfortable for autistic children who are often overwhelmed and uncomfortable in dental offices. They typically get anxiety and fear from the over stimulation of lights, sounds, and equipment.

The researchers adapted the dental environment to be a better sensory fit for autistic children. They turned off overhead lights and headlamps, played soothing music and projected slow-moving visual effects on the ceiling to help calm and distract the kids. They even altered the chair, which, instead of using straps used butterfly shaped arms that acted like a deep-pressure hug.

The study found that children who had appointments in the sensory adapted dental office had decreased anxiety, reported lower pain and sensory discomfort.

If you have an autistic child, discuss adaption options with your dentist so that your child can experience the dentist with the least amount of anxiety.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/293815.php

Feb2

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Oral Health

Those that unfortunately suffer from rheumatoid arthritis could indeed be at risk for oral health problems as well. Current research has suggested that rheumatoid arthritis can put a patient at greater risk for gum disease among other oral health issues, but there is a light at the end of the tunnel: there are steps you can take to keep your teeth and gums healthy.

One of the most common forms of bacteria buildup in the mouth, gingivitis, causes an “inflammation of the gums and tissues” and because rheumatoid arthritis patients are more susceptible to “chronic inflammatory diseases” it puts them at a higher risk of developing the disease. Also, because of the stiffness created from rheumatoid arthritis, the process of brushing and flossing could also be affected, again potentially leading to more bacteria forming in the oral cavities.

Patients cannot rid themselves of this arthritis, however, so what can they do specifically to help them from forming this bacteria buildup? First, schedule regular visits with your dentist to check in and help you monitor your dental health and hygiene. If there are indeed problems, they will be the first to know and the first to help you back to a normal healthy smile!

Next, if it is harder to hold the regular toothbrush, try switching to an electric one that will assist to getting in all the “nooks and crannies” of your teeth. Also, there are specific toothpastes and mouthwashes out there that require a prescription (your dentist can write this for you) that also aim to assist in bacteria prevention in the mouth. If you take the proper precaution and see your dentist regularly and also simply do not neglect your oral health, living with rheumatoid arthritis and a healthy mouth will be possible!

http://www.everydayhealth.com/rheumatoid-arthritis/important-dental-tips-for-ra-patients-5837.aspx

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